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Johnson County

76 N. Main Street
Buffalo, WY 82834
(P) 307.684.7272

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Description:

Johnson County, Wyoming ranges from the rolling plains of the Old West and the towering peaks of the Bighorn Mountains. It’s a land rich in both history and scenery. The County Seat of Johnson County, Wyoming is the City of Buffalo, with a population of just over 4,500 people. The county is also home to the town of Kaycee.

2020-08-18T16:09:28+00:00Partner|

Robert Briggs

Planning Director
307.675.0814
rbriggs@SHERIDAN.EDU

Northern Wyoming Community College District (NWCCD)
1 Whitney Way
Sheridan, WY 82801
Phone 2: 307.751.8602

Description:

Robert Briggs currently serves as the Planning Director for the Northern Wyoming Community College District in Sheridan Wyoming. Prior to moving back to Sheridan, Robert served as the Planning and Development Director for the City of Cheyenne. Raised in an Air Force family, he had the opportunity to grow up in communities across the United States, and overseas in Turkey and England. As a young adult he also lived in Brazil, where he met his wife. Robert holds a Master’s Degree in Sociology from Utah State University, and Master’s Degree in Regional Planning from the University at Albany. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP).

Robert moved to Sheridan with his family in 2004. An active member of community’s Economic Development Taskforce, he also serves as the administrator for the Sheridan Economic and Educational Development Authority (SEEDA) Joint Powers Board. Robert is a graduate of the Sheridan CiViC Project, and participated in initiatives connected to the Center for a Vital Community’s community dialogue on poverty. In addition to serving on the WEDA Board of Directors, he also serves on the WEDA Legislative Committee.

2020-07-06T15:58:01+00:00Management Council|

Cooperative Utilities: A Benefit to Business and Community

When choosing a location for a business, access to reliable, low-cost energy is a primary consideration. Affordable power reduces operating expenses from the start. That’s one reason Wyoming is an attractive state for business — it has a history of providing lower electric rates than the national average.

Powder River Energy Corporation (PRECorp) is a mainstay in eastern Wyoming, offering some of the lowest residential electric rates around. The independent, nonprofit electric cooperative provides reliable, at-cost energy to nearly 12,000 members.

The difference between electric providers may not be readily apparent but it becomes stark when separated for rate comparison. A typical residential household in northeast Wyoming uses about 1,200 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity per month. When municipal, investor-owned and cooperative electric providers are combined, the average Wyoming residential electric bill is $181 per 1,200 kWh/month, while the national electric bill average is $199.

When broken out for Wyoming, investor-owned utilities in Wyoming average $226 per month for residential bills. Municipal and cooperative utilities have significantly lower average costs of $148 and $169 per month, respectively. PRECorp weighs in at $146 for 1,200 kWh.

This savings of at least $57 per month, or $684 per year, makes a big difference for residential households. The savings potential would exponentially increase for businesses since their energy usage is much higher than an average household, particularly in the case of large manufacturers or data centers.

The Cooperative Advantage

Businesses and industry in PRECorp’s service territory benefit from its low energy rates, which translate to lower operating costs. Besides competitive rates, electric cooperatives have added benefits to the people they serve, who are member-owners, not just customers. This means customer service is prioritized and each member-consumer has a say in co-op business.

Because not-for-profit cooperatives operate at cost, excess revenues after expenses are returned to members in the form of capital credits, which are like dividends. These credits could be paid back to the consumer in the form of a rebate check or a bill credit. PRECorp has retired an impressive $49.1 million to consumer-members since 2004. In 2018 alone, it returned $8.4 million in capital credits.

Unlike investor-owned utilities that aim to make profits for shareholders, co-ops like PRECorp operate under cooperative principles, one of which is “commitment to community.” This pledge is illustrated through the PRECorp Economic Development Program, which acts as a conduit of funds and resources for local economic development projects, as well as its PRECorp Foundation charitable arm, which supports a range of charitable activities.

The many cooperative advantages are hard to deny. For a prospective business looking to relocate, some attractive sites are served by PRECorp. Tiger Transfer industrial park in Upton is one of these advantageous locations. Several hundred shovel-ready acres are available in the park with plenty of opportunity for expansion.

Stephanie Salazar, executive director of the Upton Economic Development Board notes that co-ops are much more sensitive to the quality of their customer service and the impact of their rates since they’re owned by the customers they serve. She enjoys working with utility cooperatives and appreciates their lower utility bills, responsive customer service, and involvement in the community.

“PRECorp’s service and rates give Tiger Transfer industrial park a definitive advantage for attracting businesses that require reliable affordable electricity,” Salazar says. “Plus, PRECorp partners with us not only to promote the park, but to attract business and jobs to Upton. Now that is commitment to community!

Powder River Energy Corporation (PRECorp) is known as northeastern Wyoming’s preferred energy provider. The nonprofit cooperative also works diligently with its member owners to improve the communities it serves. PRECorp has developed powerful partnerships with private, public and nonprofit organizations. These collaborative efforts aim to strengthen communities and create a more diverse economy.

2020-06-30T16:55:46+00:00News|

Business Council Welcomes New Board Members

This month, we welcome four new members to the Wyoming Business Council board of directors, and we bid farewell to four whose terms have ended. We had the opportunity to meet the new board members and glean some wisdom from some of the outgoing members.

2020-06-30T21:55:48+00:00News|

Gillette Potential Markets for Coal

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2020-07-20T23:18:32+00:00Education|

ENDOW

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2020-07-20T23:16:43+00:00Education|

Carbon XPRIZE

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2020-07-21T00:01:52+00:00Education|

Atlas Carbon

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2020-07-21T00:02:22+00:00Education|

Advanced Carbon Sites

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2020-07-20T23:11:42+00:00Education|

Advanced Carbon Products

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2020-07-20T23:12:15+00:00Education|